Rule of faith

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"By 'analogy of faith' we mean the coherence of the truths of faith among themselves and within the whole plan of Revelation" (CCC #114).

Scripture

The phrase "analogy of faith" is found in Romans 12:6:

6 Since we have gifts that differ according to the grace given to us, let us exercise them: if prophecy, in proportion to the faith;

7 if ministry, in ministering; if one is a teacher, in teaching;

8 if one exhorts, in exhortation; if one contributes, in generosity; if one is over others, with diligence; if one does acts of mercy, with cheerfulness.

Greek
ἔχοντες δὲ χαρίσματα κατὰ τὴν χάριν τὴν δοθεῖσαν ἡμῖν διάφορα, εἴτε προφητείαν κατὰ τὴν ἀναλογίαν τῆς πίστεως.
"kata ten analogian tes pisteos" literally means "according to the analogy of faith."
Latin
"analogia fidei" = "analogy of faith"
The early Fathers of the Church used "regula fidei" ("rule of faith") to mean "something extrinsic to our faith, and serving as its norm or measure"[1]

References

Scripture

Rom 12:6-8

6 Since we have gifts that differ according to the grace given to us, let us exercise them: if prophecy, in proportion to the faith [ἀναλογίαν τῆς πίστεως];

7 if ministry, in ministering; if one is a teacher, in teaching;

8 if one exhorts, in exhortation; if one contributes, in generosity; if one is over others, with diligence; if one does acts of mercy, with cheerfulness.

Gal 6:14-16

14 But may I never boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world.

15 For neither does circumcision mean anything, nor does uncircumcision, but only a new creation.

16 Peace and mercy be to all who follow this rule and to the Israel of God.

Patristic Era

Ignatius (Philadelphians 7-9); Irenaeus (Against Heresies 3:17); and Tertullian (Prescription, 9,13,37,44).[1]

Tertullian(160-225 AD)
Let our "seeking," therefore be in that which is our own, and from those who are our own, and concerning that which is our own, - that, and only that, which can become an object of inquiry without impairing the rule of faith.[2]

Etymology

Greek
ἀναλογίαν
κανών
Latin
regula fidei
analogia fidei
English
analogy
rule, ruler
canon

References

  1. Strong's Concordance, 2583, kanón.
  2. On Prescription Against Heretics, 12: see also chapter 13: Ante-Nicene Fathers, vol. 3, eds. Roberts and Donaldson, 1976, p. 249

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