Opinion polls: Difference between revisions

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(Created page with "* [http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-science-of-disestimation "The Science of 'Disestimation': Why we shouldn't put our faith in opinion polls,"] ''Scientific ...")
 
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* [http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-science-of-disestimation "The Science of 'Disestimation': Why we shouldn't put our faith in opinion polls,"] ''Scientific American'', December 2010, p. 31.
* Charles Seife, [http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-science-of-disestimation "The Science of 'Disestimation': Why we shouldn't put our faith in opinion polls,"] ''Scientific American'', December 2010, p. 31.
::The headlines that pronounced, by implication, that atheists are better informed by believers, were wrong.  The difference in the results are skewed and fall well within the margin of error for the kind of poll that was conducted.  "The press leaped on the atheists versus believers headlines without critically examining the numbers.  The Pew study revealed less about our faith in God than it did about our faith in polls--which, far too often, is blind."


[[Category:Culture Wars]]
[[Category:Culture Wars]]

Latest revision as of 19:25, 10 January 2011

The headlines that pronounced, by implication, that atheists are better informed by believers, were wrong. The difference in the results are skewed and fall well within the margin of error for the kind of poll that was conducted. "The press leaped on the atheists versus believers headlines without critically examining the numbers. The Pew study revealed less about our faith in God than it did about our faith in polls--which, far too often, is blind."